FakeRAID on ubuntu using dmraid – Part3

Continued from FakeRAID on ubuntu using dmraid – Part2

As mentioned in the previous post, I first searched for some windows based application which can be used to rebuild/sync the RAID-SET. Found AMD RAIDXpert.

After installation, I was able to access the RAIDXpert Management Console by going to https://localhost:8443/amd/screen.jsp in the browser window.

As soon as I logged into the Management Console using default admin/admin, I first changed the password(although this machine is sitting behind NAT) and then went to the Logical Drive View >> Logical Drive 1 >> Synchronization Tab and selected ‘Redundancy Check’ from the drop down box:

but it gave me the following error:

RAIDXpert_redundancy_check_rejected

I tried to look for some other options and found that ‘Rebuild’, ‘Initialization’ and ‘Activate’ buttons were faded: (Possibly, this only works if the RAID-SET has been created using this tool – didn’t care to read the manual at least for now..)

RAIDXpert_activate_initialization_activate_disabled

Went to Synchronization again and ‘Fix’ was there as the default option, clicked on ‘Start Now’ button:

RAIDXpert_sync_in_progress

Time taken: 1:33AM – 4:14AM

After the ‘Fix’ finished, ‘Redundancy Check’ seems to be running fine:

RAIDXpert_redundancy_check_running_fine

After finishing the ‘Redundancy Check’, which came fine, I went ahead and booted into Linux to check if the partitions which were deleted manually on the second hard drive have been copied, from the first hard disk.

In order to check the same, following steps were followed:

Checked for the partition listing

$sudo fdisk -ls /dev/sd{b,c}

Disk /dev/sdb: 1000.2 GB, 1000204886016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 121601 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0xb768a91d

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sdb1               1       60796   488343838+  83  Linux
/dev/sdb2           60797      121593   488351902+   7  HPFS/NTFS

Disk /dev/sdc: 1000.2 GB, 1000204886016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 121601 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0xb768a91d

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sdc1               1       60796   488343838+  83  Linux
/dev/sdc2           60797      121593   488351902+   7  HPFS/NTFS

Both the drives are having exactly the same partition layout.

Deactivated the RAID-SET

$sudo dmraid -an -v
 INFO: Deactivating partition raid set "pdc_gdiiehcgj1"
 INFO: Deactivating partition raid set "pdc_gdiiehcgj2"
 INFO: Deactivating mirror raid set "pdc_gdiiehcgj"

After this, I mounted the first two partitions from both the drives and they had a couple of files – compared the md5sum for those files and it was exactly the same.

Conclusion: Test results from within Windows have been positive so far. AMD RAIDXpert has been able to sync the RAID-SET from within windows successfully.

From here, I’m going to work on the following tests:
1. Will remove the partition table of the first HDD using dd and then will try to re-sync the drives from within Linux using dmraid – which of course, chance are, will not work due to PDC metadata format.
2. Will use dmraid to erase the metadata

$sudo dmraid -r -E /dev/sdb and then try to rebuild the array.
Do you really want to erase "pdc" ondisk metadata on /dev/sdb ? [y/n]

3. Although, I have not been able to check if the Controller Chipset(AMD SB850 controller) on my mainboard supports ISW, I might still try to get rid of existing RAID-SET and then will try creating a new one using ISW to see if it works.

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